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Global Peace Volunteer Camp Teaches Service for Personal Transformation

Global Peace Volunteer Camp in Indonesia. 

Thirty nine students from universities and senior high schools in Indonesia attended the Global Peace Volunteer (GPV) camp at Puncak on July 9-10, 2011.  The main aim of the GPV camp is to raise young leaders to live for the sake of others and become examples in building a culture of service.

Participants learned that developing intellectual knowledge through years of school without developing the heart and qualities of character can lead to lack of balance. Raising leaders with integrity, where mind and heart are in balance, will ensure greater peace and prosperity for the nation.

“The important thing in our life is our starting point, the vision,” one presenter told the students. “To be employed in Disneyland, a person needs to go through training to understand the vision and dreams of Walt Disney. Centered on your vision, you work hard to realize it.”

Intimate ‘Heart to Heart’ sessions at night enabled participants to reflect on their lives, from the lowest times to peak moments. Pairs of students were given one candle, with the light's off and with quiet music in the air, and asked to explain their life course to their partner. Many were deeply moved and gained new inspiration to build a better future for themselves and those around them.

Participants during the Global Peace Volunteer Camp. 

“Life is definitely too short for you to live without knowing what you want in your life, what potential you possess and how to make use of your potential to reach your goals,” one participant reflected. “Life is not about you or “’them,” it’s about us. That’s why everything that happens in our life concerns us, ourselves. So we have to lose the selfishness and try our best to be the most useful person.”

During the camp, participants were challenged to go into the community, without any money or resources, and find opportunities to help others. Surprisingly, each group had an extraordinary human story to tell. Through the exercise many learned to care for and understand others more deeply. 

“If you want anything to change, just change yourself,” another participant said. “One person can make news, but as people (together) we can make a history.”